Lost&Found: About the Project

This video documents and describes the Fellows’ process as they tackled the Lost&Found project. “Lost&Found: Flic#k_fl&i%20ck% k*er,=flic/ker %20ing” was an interactive video performance conducted by the Visual Arts Imaging Research Center Fellow Program. In this collaboration with the UMBC Department…

Lost&Found: About the Project

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This video documents and describes the Fellows’ process as they tackled the Lost&Found project.

“Lost&Found: Flic#k_fl&i%20ck% k*er,=flic/ker %20ing” was an interactive video performance conducted by the Visual Arts Imaging Research Center Fellow Program. In this collaboration with the UMBC Department of Theater, the IRC Fellow students solicited true stories of loss as the basis for their script. They posted questions onto fliers such as “when did you loose your way?” or “have you lost religion?” They also made postings onto social networks such as Craigslist, Facebook, reddit.com and other sites. From the responses of these postings a script evolved that formed the basis of a multi-channel video production in collaboration with several actors. The Fellows created an archive of video, animation and audio files to be used interactively during a live performance, including light sensors that they built to be placed onto candles. When the actors spoke, their breath flickered the candle flame and produced a shadow over the sensor, thereby allowing a variety of live effects on the screen projected behind them. It was important to the Fellows that the audience be allowed to navigate the performance as well as the actors. Therefore, the Fellows designed and implemented their own interface wheel that altered the video. Additionally, they invited the audience to expand on the script in real time by allowing their typed anecdotes to mix with the video during the live performance.

Lost & Found uses 3 channels of video; audio, several props with hand built light dependent resistors (LDRs); laptop with s-video out; midi keyboard; DV live video camera input; 4 scenes composed in Isadora software programmed by Mark Coniglio on the Mac OSX; open sound control (OSC) and a Gluion hardware interface (analog to digital) by Sukandar Kartadinata. We are grateful for the support of the IRC; Department of Theater; Department of Visual Arts and the CADVC. A very special thanks goes to all the participants who shared their stories.

To see more about the Lost&Found project, or to see other projects created by the Visual Arts IRC Fellows Program, please visit irc.umbc.edu/ircfellows/lost_found

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