Japanese Bride School, Yokosuka, Japan, March 1956 US Navy; Silent Raw Footage

Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney more at http://quickfound.net/ Silent. Raw footage. 1) INTERIOR OF OFFICE BUILDING AT YOKOSUKA, JAPAN, USN SAILOR AND JAPANESE BRIDE-TO-BE TYPING, THEY STOP TO CHAT. 2) TYPEWRITER KEYS STRIKING PAPER, WORDS “JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY” ON…

Japanese Bride School, Yokosuka, Japan, March 1956 US Navy; Silent Raw Footage

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Support this channel: https://paypal.me/jeffquitney OR https://www.patreon.com/jeffquitney

more at http://quickfound.net/

Silent. Raw footage.

1) INTERIOR OF OFFICE BUILDING AT YOKOSUKA, JAPAN, USN SAILOR AND JAPANESE BRIDE-TO-BE TYPING, THEY STOP TO CHAT.

2) TYPEWRITER KEYS STRIKING PAPER, WORDS “JAPANESE TEA CEREMONY” ON PAPER

3) JAPANESE GIRL TYPING, SHE LOOKS UP AS IF SPEAKING…

5) GRADUATING CLASS OF JAPANESE GIRLS WHO HAVE TAKEN BRIDE SCHOOL ABOUT TO REOEIVE THEIR DIPLOMAS; ONE OFFICIAL ON STAGE RISES AND INTRODUCES AMERICAN MRS. CALLAHAN WHO IN TURN RISES AND PRESENTS DIPLOMAS.

6) MRS. CALLAHAN HANDS OUT DIPLOMAS; ONE GIRL WALKS UP TO RECEIVE HERS

7) MRS. CALLAHAN HANDING DIPLOMA TO JAPANESE GIRL (OUT OF FOCUS

8) JAPANESE GIRL RECEIVING HER DIPLOMA.

9) GIRL SEATED IN AUDIENCE. FUZZY

10) AUDIENCE LISTENS TO EXCERISES.

11) COMMISSARY AT YOKOSUKA, JAPAN, AMERICAN HOUSEWIFE AND TWO JAPANESE GIRLS SHOPPING

Originally a public domain film from the National Archives, slightly cropped to remove uneven edges, with the aspect ratio corrected, and one-pass brightness-contrast-color correction & mild video noise reduction applied.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_bride
Wikipedia license: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/3.0/

War brides are women who married military personnel from other countries in times of war or during military occupations, a practice that occurred in great frequency during World War I and World War II.

Among the largest and best documented examples of this were the marriages between American servicemen and German women which took place after World War II. By 1949, over 20,000 German war brides had emigrated to the United States. Furthermore, it is estimated that there are “… 15,000 Australian women who married American servicemen based in Australia during World War II and moved to the US to be with their husbands”. Allied servicemen also married many women in other countries where they were stationed at the end of the war, including France, Italy, Luxembourg, the Philippines, Japan and China. This also occurred in Korea and Vietnam with the later wars in those countries involving U.S. troops and other anti-communist soldiers. As many as 70,000 GI war brides left the United Kingdom, 150,000 to 200,000 hailed from continental Europe, 15,500 from Australia and 1,500 from New Zealand, between the years 1942 and 1952.

The reasons for women marrying foreign soldiers and leaving their homelands vary. Particularly after World War II, many women in devastated European and Asian countries saw marriage as a means of escaping their devastated countries…

During and immediately after World War II, more than 60,000 U.S. servicemen married women overseas and they were promised that their wives and children would receive free passage to the U.S. The U.S. Army’s “Operation War Bride”, which eventually transported an estimated 70,000 women and children, began in Britain in early 1946. The press dubbed it “Operation Diaper Run”. The first batch of war brides (452 British women and their 173 children and one Bridegroom) left Southampton harbor on SS Argentina on January 26, 1946 and arrived in the U.S. on February 4, 1946. Over the years, an estimated 300,000 foreign war brides moved to the United States following the passage of the War Brides Act of 1945 and its subsequent amendments, of which 51,747 were Filipinos and an estimated 50,000 were Japanese.

Robyn Arrowsmith, a historian who spent nine years researching Australia’s war brides, said between 12,000 and 15,000 Australian women had married visiting U.S. servicemen and moved to the U.S. with their husbands. Significantly, an estimated 30,000 to 40,000 Newfoundland women married American servicemen during the time of Ernest Harmon Air Force Base’s existence (1941-1966), in which tens of thousands of U.S. servicemen arrived to defend the island and North America from Nazi Germany during World War II and the Soviet Union during the Cold War. Many of these war brides settled in the U.S., so much so that in 1966 the Newfoundland government created a tourism campaign specifically tailored to provide opportunities for them and their families to reunite…

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/War_Brides_Act

The War Brides Act (59 Stat. 659, Act of Dec. 28, 1945) was enacted (on December 28, 1945) to allow alien spouses, natural children, and adopted children of members of the United States Armed Forces, “if admissible,” to enter the U.S. as non-quota immigrants after World War II. More than 100,000 entered the United States under this Act and its extensions and amendments until it expired in December 1948…

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